Are You Ready for 4K and ATSC 3.0?

If you’re not, don’t sweat it. 4K isn’t ready for 4K, and ATSC 3.0 isn’t either. Spoiler Alert: 4K TV RF/IP rests on a number of emerging technologies, so this blog is a longer than normal. Your Eyes Aren’t 4K The problem is, your eyes can’t discern 4K from normal viewing distances. You’d have to be less than 10’ from your 75” 4K TV to begin to see…

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Contemporary Research Utilizes Coax Optimal Performance Cost Effectiveness

Coax cable is still widely used in a variety of RF applications.  From mini sizes in two-way radios to rigid hardline and waveguides for high-power microwave transmitters, coax remains relevant. In fact, coax technology is evolving and still useful for more than just single-channel applications. Recent digital innovations have improved coax cables, increasing the…

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Working with Latency in Digital RF Applications

Latency is the delay between the video source and the time it takes to appear on the TV or screen. For live presentations from an on-site video switcher, the delay is usually due to scaling and rescaling the video, as well as processing delays in switching and effects. This can typically range from nearly instant to a few seconds. In digital RF and IPTV, an HD program…

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Coaxial Cable Is Still A Player

Ring out the old, ring in the…old? Now that we’re firmly ensconced in the age of digital AV, barreling toward the second half of the second decade of the 21st century (cue dramatic music), it’s worth a moment to sit back and think about this question: How would you futureproof a new digital AV installation, particularly as it applies to cabling and signal…

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Behold the Common Coax Cable.

RF COAX is common in the sense it has delivered HD entertainment in every home and apartment you’ve lived in, delivering RF cable, off-air, and satellite channels. For cable users, coax carries high-speed Internet and telephone service as well. Coax also carries HD-SDI video in network studios, TV stations and houses of worship. Corporate and civic sites distribute…

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Yes, You Can Insert HD Programs into your Cable (and not be Bad Rob Lowe)

First, a disclaimer – I recently changed to Comcast Xfinity from DirecTV, and did not become bad Rob Lowe. In fact, I can record more shows at the same time, access many free on demand TV shows, and have blazing Internet speeds. I’ve also noticed that cable companies have become easier to work with for commercial applications – primarily offering several ways to…

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CR RF Calculator

We’ve created an intelligent calculator for estimating RF levels for basic coax applications. You’ll need Excel 2010 or higher to use the form – older versions can’t support the advanced data features. We suggest you experiment with the app, and feel free to email questions to Doug Engstrom. Here’s the basic concept: Select the channel bandwidth from a pull-down…

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What’s the difference between QAM and ATSC?

The terms ATSC and QAM define how digital channels are broadcast. ATSC stands for Advanced Television Standards Committee and QAM is an acronym for Quadrature Amplitude Modulation. There is also QPSK, which is a format used for satellite broadcasting – but since those are received by proprietary satellite TV boxes, not HDTV tuners and TVs, it’s not important for this…

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